Why Utter Pragmatists Study Liberal Arts

We don’t train students in a narrow idealogical vision but in a big understanding of God and the world he has made.

Recently, Mark Cuban made headlines when he encouraged the rising generation of students not to go to school and take classes on finance and computer science but to focus on liberal arts. Don’t go for school for finance, go to school and study the liberal arts. Study history, philosophy, arts, and many more because they train you to look at data and come away with your own take on it. We would say that there is something to Cuban’s point. We think that in recent years the liberal arts have come under fire because of the art history degrees for which students go to a top flight school and graduate with thousands of dollars worth of debt only to work a part-time job.

Today is the age of diversity, when we’re all supposed to be promoting diversity. In our increasingly politicized age there is only one viewpoint that is allowed in the public square. If you hold a conservative, evangelical, or republican viewpoint you are almost certainly on the outside. Diversity has never been more praised but has never been in shorter order at the intellectual level. American society is intellectually less welcoming to diversity than it has ever been.

We need to be champions of good thinking. We want to train students in intellectual diversity while holding firm to absolute truth. We are not scared to present other viewpoints to students provided we do so with wisdom. In this sense Christians increasingly find themselves as some of the last supporters of true intellectual diversity in this world. The irony is this: we are those who believe that the truth is unified. Whatever degree program we enter there is truth out there and students desperately need it. We don’t train students in a narrow idealogical vision but in a big understanding of God and the world he has made.